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Front fork slider removal 1 month 6 hours ago #32647

  • rockley
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Obviously there's a Kawasaki special tool to hold the lower part of the fork whilst you turn the allen bolt at the bottom to stop it from spinning round. The nut from the rear axle is a good fit into the lower part of the fork. I used one of my long 10mm engine bolts (pattern part for the addition of crash bars) to position the nut into the lower fork by trapping the axel nut between two 10mm nuts and then using two more 10mm nuts at the other end, turned against each other, so a spanner stops the rod turning. It worked a treat.
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Front fork slider removal 4 weeks 1 day ago #32657

  • dcarver220b
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Possible to upload some pictures? Hard for me to visualize.

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Front fork slider removal 4 weeks 1 day ago #32659

  • rockley
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Hopefully pictures uploaded, I'm new on here so getting use to platform. Thanks for your interest. 

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Front fork slider removal 3 weeks 3 days ago #32690

  • Bucko
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A broom handle stuffed down the forks along with an impact driver works wonders.
Hello from Canada's We(s)t coast.

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Front fork slider removal 3 weeks 3 days ago #32692

  • rockley
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I tried it with a broom handle (only one I had) but it just knurled the end of the wood. I pressed as hard as I could. It didn't help that the bike has not been used for 7 years and stored outside under a tarpaulin. 

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Front fork slider removal 3 weeks 3 days ago #32693

  • Kawboy
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The first time I tore apart a front shock I was a young auto mechanic apprentice. My tools were minimal but 2 of the first tools I bought was an impact gun and an air ratchet. I can appreciate the fact that a lot of motorcycle guys that do their own work don't have an air compressor so an air impact driver is out of the question but their are a lot of electric impact drivers that work quite well.
So, think about removing a wheel from a car- If you use a tire wrench, you have to hold the wheel from turning when using the wrench. Usually you break the nuts loose with the wheel on the ground, then lift the vehicle and remove the wheel. if you use an impact , you can have the wheel off the ground and just break the nuts loose and remove.
So why did I digress back to this example?? Same principal can work here when you don't have the "special tool (cylinder holder)" What I do when disassembling a shock.
With the shock on the bench, the first thing I do is put an impact driver on the Allen head screw in the bottom of the shock and break it free and remove it. Why do this first?? The compression spring in the shock sits on top of the inner cylinder which is the part the Allen head screw is threaded into. The friction of the compression spring as installed, holds the inner cylinder with a little force to offset the turning of the Allen screw with an impact gun. Once the Allen head screw is out, continue disassembly of the shock and do what work you need to.
When reassembling, reinstall the inner cylinder and install the Allen head screw but don't tighten it down until the very last thing you do. The Allen head screw will hold the inner cylinder in place so you can reassemble the rest of the shock and once all the pieces are in and together, tighten down the Allen head screw

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